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already about religion in taxes than foreign policy. what did the founders he talked about in your vocab to say about america's role in the world? >> guest: i think again this is a matter of great dispute. there was one major foreign policy issue in the washington administration that was the war between france and england and what they were going to do about it. even then you had two very distinctive positions. hamilton was roughly pro-british. jefferson was pro-french and this really is what led to the huge split between those two men. the national bank issue was controversial, but this is how the federalists and republicans aligned with whether they were going to favor britain or france out or could eventually produce all sorts of other things. i think the hamiltonian edition, which washington accepted as america ought to be mutual because it had no army, no navy. he didn't have money at the time. it had a strong interest in trade with england in france and just basic machiavelli and self-interest that america should remain mutual. neutrality favored the british because there is no ame
, do you differ in any areas in foreign policy with respect particularly with respect to former yugoslavia republican of mass done ya, and turkey, and care to comment about people in greece who are encouraging closer relations with israel some because they have fallen out with turkey? but i'd like to get some idea who how you view current foreign policy in greece. >> translator: i could tell you that -- is that a country doesn't have continue newty in the foreign policy. we going to come not to do a 180 and turn everything around, but able to give a multidimensional and active tone to our foreign policy. during my meeting with the u.s. ambassador, earlier this week, he told me what does it mean? what is multiidimensional and active foreign policy mean? greece is a country in europe but it's not like the other european countries. we're not lucky enough to be bordered by sweden. our borders are a hot bed. a hot area in the met mediterranean basin inspect is an area that is historically has been a region where there have been attempts to assert one's claims and make attempts associ
christian conservatives, foreign-policy conservatives, and we pretty much get along on everything. i don't think there's very many things we disagree on. we discussed every issue that comes along every week we have two meetings a year african heads of 100 conservative organization. i can say they are as enthusiastic as either. the movement continues to grow. there's always new young writers coming along. authors periodicals and things that are vibrant for any movement it's going to stay alive. generally speaking given the ups and nasa politics is as good a shape as it is there have. i'm the chairman of the intercollegiate studies institute. others of you have participated there. an organization is events constantly doing a number of amazing things on college campuses across the country. has the largest list of professors associated with any organization sab association, somewhere in the 15,000 to 20,000 range. all sorts of things going on and will continue to go on. to summarize coming back to whittaker chambers, it's safe to say we chambers did as was mentioned earlier in the conference
should be our foreign policy, keeping gadhafi empower, is that four or in opposition to american interests? i don't get them as issues' notebook. those are policy issues. i'm mainly concerned with regime issues. but you take your point, i am making a distinction between the democratic sovereignty and so i guess they don't have an objection to the overthrow of the burmese government. it would have an objection is a policy, i don't think to be a good policy to change every country in the world i am not advocating not in any sense. we can argue about different policies. i'm saying is a form of government, the liberal democratic nationstate is superior to other forms of government. one would be global governance. others isn't autocratic regime. i talk about russia and china has autocratic regimes than i do see any problem pushiness countries in a democratic direction, not by force, the public affairs and so on would be an acceptable policy. we could do it or not do it is a policy decision. of course there is radical islam, which establishes sharia as the constitutional structure and
to the conservative view point whether it be on foreign policy and anti-communism, economic conservativism or limited government, constitutionalism or what today is called social conservativism, more likely then it would be called traditional conservativism. the issues were a little different and less clear back then. but there's always been social conservativism. rusher had a very important ally, a man named frank meyer. meyer remains sufficiently respected and known among at least an older generation of conservatives that there is a frank meyer society here in washington which i'm going to be a little, a group of conservative leaders who keep his memory alive. they're going to be meeting on monday night, and i'm going to be speaking to them. meyer has been tribed by rusher as -- described by rusher as the intellectual engine of the conservative movement. he, too, was an ex-communist, as burnham was. but meyer was a conservative activist. a passionate conservative activist. rusher even told me that meyer had once been a militant communist. i, rusher, had been a militant republican. quote: they're no
viewpoint whether it be on foreign policy and anti-communist some come economic conservatism, the limited government, constitutionalism or what today is called social conservatism more likely than it would be called traditional conservatism. the issues were a little different and less clear back then there's always been social conservatism. rusher had a very important ally named frank meijer. meijer remains a respected and known at least an older generation of conservatives that there is a society here in washington which i'm going to be a group of leaders that keep this memo alive and they are good to be meeting on monday night and i am going to be speaking to them. he's been described as the intellectual engine of the conservative movement. he too was an ex-communist. but he was a conservative activist. a passionate conservative activist. rusher even told me that he had once been a militant communist viet cong had been a militant republican. quote, they are not all that far apart accepting what they believe. what he meant by that is the have a tremendous attraction and respect for frank
's foreign policy, aid related or diplomacy in our presence throughout the world. you know, if you look back to, say, congress can 20, 25 years ago, it was essentially made up of people who had a relationship to world war ii and its aftermath in terms of u.s. global engagement, the marshall plan and the rebuilding of japan and america's presence. and the relationship also, i mean, and the lessons and the threat posed by the cold war. and those were very defining, major umbrella issues that produced great statesmen, henry jackson and others, on a bipartisan politics at the water's edge, america's presence b and engagement around the world. two superpowers of the um real la that kind of -- umbrella was kind of held over the world and stifled the kind of regional and local factions and tensions that erupted after the end of the cold war. that all had a significant impact on the american people and commitment, i think, and support for the commitment for the u.s. to be a global, globally engaged, the superpower. um, it was the possibility of a five-alarm fire, and everybody's in to try to keep th
. this is an ancient tradition that doesn't harm people. the arrogance by which the united states foreign policy trusted dictate terms to countries like bolivia, less than 1% of any excess cocaine in bolivia ends up in the united states. the heavy-handed nature of u.s. policy, you would think this is can't -- some kind of flood. now imagine if the united nations and the guardians of the un convention were to treat coffee with the content they treat cocoa. what would happen if they told bolivia's and peruvians you have to stop chewing coca which they have been doing for centuries, if not thousands of years? imagine if they did that to the united states. you have to give up this habit. what would happen? well, a friend of mine actually did this. andrew epstein went to amherst college. in 2001 he conspired with the school demonstration in student government to secretly been coffee for one day without notice during finals week. so all the students get up the morning. there's no coffee in the cafeteria, bookstore, no coffee being sold on campus. they have fans dress up and trenchcoats as drug dealers
tradition that doesn't harm people and the arrogance by which the foreign policy traced to dictate terms and countries like bolivia less than 1% of any excess cocaine in bolivia and set in the united states. and the heavy-handed nature of the policy would think this is some kind of a flood from bolivia the way that we dictate terms in this country. now imagine if the united nations and the u.n. convention were to treat coffee the way with the content they treat coca what would happen if they tell oblivion's chewing coca which they'd been doing for centuries if not thousands of years imagine if they did that to the united states you have to give up this habit now. she was a major that went to elmhurst college, and in 2001 he comes by europe with the administration to secretly them coffee for one day without notice during finals week as a project so all these students get up in the morning and there's no coffee in the bookstore area sold on campus and they have friends dress up in trenchcoats as drug dealers. you want to buy a shot of espresso? $6. and people were actually buying this stuf
to people and make speeches and go to the foreign policy association and all that of course, the vietnam war was raging at that time. pauline frederick, who was, as you know, one of the great broadcasters, before this tour in 1968 said to me -- i was nervous about it. i was just back from my first tour of vietnam. she said, "well, you know, people on this, the correspondents, chancellor and that crowd are going to talk about what the president said to them last week. what you should do is tell them what a gi in the mekong delta said to you last week." i thought that was pretty sensible advice and did that and talked about what i felt was a real age of heroism. i hadn't really seen america and america's men and appreciated what they were until i saw them at war. it was a startling sight. i tried to get some of this across to an audience in san diego where we were all assembled and chancellor, who had taken an anti-war line, of course, referred to me as madame nhu, who was not exactly the most popular character at that time in our history. c-span: who was she? >> guest: well, she was diem's si
a member of the appropriations committee speaks to the council on foreign relations on how foreign policy is affected by the budget and debt. that is at 830 eastern. and janet napolitano will focus on cybersecurity and immigration and terrorism and disaster relief. that will be at 9:30 p.m. on c-span3. on c-span, at 10:00 a.m. eastern, massachusetts senator john kerry testifies before the foreign relations committee. is it against the confirmation process for john kerry and secretary of state. he is scheduled to be introduced by secretary of state hillary clinton. >> this started in the 1940s with sylvia porter. and has been in the 1930s, the hard economic times of the 1930s. we see everything from alcoholics anonymous to napoleon thinking they can get rich and fascism and communism, and that was something that you can feel at the time. there is a cool thing going on at that time. and so we developed personal-finance out of this. sylvia's goal is to educate people so that the great depression will never happen again. but it is of its time. the idea that we can teach people certain skills
.s. bishops' outreach and service to refugees. he's an expert in foreign policy and migration trends worldwide. ambassador, thank you for joining us. >> thank you so much, ali. and thank you for the extra ambassadorship. i only had four. [laughter] i'd like to thank ali and the forum and all of you for the invitation to be here today to say a few words. and to, um, i'd also like to thank all of the other members of the panel here for their or contributions. i'm here to represent the conference of catholic bishops. it's known sometimes by just usccb. the conference has been engaged in this issue of immigration reform for decades. we look forward to this debate and urge our elected officials not to lose this opportunity to reform a broken system. there are several areas the bishops will focus upon in this debate. first, there must be an automatic path to citizenship for the 11 million undocumented. we cannot and must not, excuse me, fall short of citizenship for the undocumented. where instead they receive legal status but no chance to become americans. we should not sanction a permanent undercl
in foreign policy. it's inevitable we're going find plays we funded people who are actually against this. as you know, i prefer less foreign involvement. >> another question from the web. the president talked about climate change. it's not something that we've heard a lot about in the debates that you've been discussing over the past hour or so. your thoughts on where it might go in the 113th congress? >> my instinct what you heard in the president's inauguration speech, he was trying to basically throw a bone to every left-wing activist group he could and so start to think about this more from this white house. they received so much pressure from labor and those who want the economy to grow like the keystone pipeline. and companies that want like solyndra. you start to see the gains being played. and this goes back to my earlier discussion. if you actually just read the speech and wrote side notes and says it's for this constituency and make this group money, if i do a keystone pipeline vote over here and allow it to go. i better throw some red meat to the environmentalist activists. i'
of the puzzle? >> that reminds me when i was in graduate school i went to study foreign policy and was right around the time they balanced the budget and i thought my gosh what am i going to do? so i realized the long-term problems were still there and i had to make a choice whether social security or health care and it was easy, social security is easy supply jumped into becoming a social security expert because health care is so hard. they're really is no other issue at the core of all of this. we don't know the answers and the best thing that we can do right now is putting in place as many different attempts to control health care costs and evaluating what works so we don't with a fork or not we've seen the costs coming down, and that could be in anticipation that could be temporary and permanent, so it's better data gathering the intra-asian, analyzing it and then figuring out what's working and doing more of that. one of the important things that happened in the changes that were just made or the exchanges on health care. it does give you the room to put an increase in the medicare ag w
of collective action on issues like foreign policy and trade, and when we leave the door from the open to new members. a new settlement subject to the democratic legitimacy and accountability of national parliaments where member states combined in flexible cooperation, respecting national differences and not always trying to eliminate them, and in which we have proved that some powers can, in fact, be returned to member states. in other words, a settlement which would be entirely in keeping with the mission for an updated european union i have described today. more flexible, more adaptable, more open, fit for the challenges of the modern age. now, to those who say, and there are those who say it, that a new settlement can't be negotiated, i would say listen to the views of other parties in other european countries arguing for powers to flow back to european states. and also look to at what we've achieved already. we have ended the obligation for britain to bail out the eurozone members. we have kept britain out of the fiscal compact. we have launched a process which turns an existing justice
, congress and the administration should be implementing policies that encourage job creation, rein in government regulations, replace our convoluted tax code with one that is fair, simple and certain, open foreign markets to american manufactured goods and agricultural products and develop a comprehensive energy policy. we are not immune from the laws of economics that face every nation. the congressional budget office estimates that government spending on health care entitlements, soegts security and -- social security and interest on the national debt will consume 100% of the total revenues generated by the federal government by the year 2025. that means the money that the government spends on national defense, transportation, veterans health care and other government programs will have to be borrowed, driving us even further into debt. c.b.o. issued a report last june which warned that unless we work to reduce our debt, we face the increased probability of a sudden fiscal crisis that would cause investors to lose confidence in the government's ability to manage its budget and th
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)